8 Ways To Improve Your Wi-Fi Signal

Tracking slows down, unable to navigate, choppy Wi-Fi signal, see wireless hotspot - any one of these problems is even more serious in a world where you breathe when you need to connect. I'm. (Well, it may not be that important ... but it is important).

Posted July 7,2020 in Ciencia y Tecnología.

nickythomas
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8 Ways To Improve Your Wi-Fi Signal

Tracking slows down, unable to navigate, choppy Wi-Fi signal, see wireless hotspot - any one of these problems is even more serious in a world where you breathe when you need to connect. I'm. (Well, it may not be that important ... but it is important).

If your Managed Wifi Services seems to be on the decline, there are many tools you can use to test your internet speed. However, if the only way to get adequate reception is to stand by your wireless router, these simple tips can help you optimize your network.

  1. Update The Router Firmware

Maybe your router just needs an update. Router manufacturers are constantly modifying their software to make things a little faster. How easy or difficult it is to update the firmware completely depends on the make and model of the device.

  1. Achieve Optimal Router Location

Not all rooms and spaces are the same. In fact, where you place the router can affect wireless coverage. It may seem logical to put the router inside the cabinet out of the way, or right next to the window where the cable connects, but this is not always the case. If possible, place the router in the center of the house instead of driving it to the other end of the house to get as much signal as possible.

  1. What Is Your Frequency?

Look at the administrator interface of your network and make sure it is configured for optimal performance. If you are using a dual band router, switching to the 5 GHz band instead of using the more common 2.4 GHz band may improve performance.

  1. Change That Channel

Interference is a major problem, especially for people living in densely populated areas. Signals from other wireless networks can affect speed, not to mention some wireless phone systems, microwave ovens, and other electronic devices.

Have you ever played with a walkie talkie when you were a kid? You may remember how the units needed to be on the same "channel" in order to listen to each other. And if you're on the same channel as your neighbor, you can listen to someone else's conversation, even if you're using a completely different set.

  1. Quality control.

Most modern routers come with quality of service (QoS) tools to limit the amount of bandwidth.

For example, you can use QoS to prioritize video calls over file downloads. That way, someone getting a large Dropbox file won't interrupt your call to grandma. (Yes, files take time, but Grandma is more important.) Depending on the QoS configuration, you can also prioritize different applications at different times of the day.

  1. Don't Trust Outdated Hardware

We recommend making the most of your existing equipment, but if you're running older hardware, you can't expect the best performance. We tend to agree with our back-end devices, especially our network equipment, that we don't fix it if it's not broken. However, if you bought your router years ago, you may be using the oldest and slowest 802.11n standard (or 802.11g is prohibited).

These wireless standards are limited to fairly low bandwidth. So all the settings described above only go so far. 802.11g has a maximum throughput of 54 Mbps, while 802.11n has a maximum throughput of 300 Mbps. The latest 802.11ac supports 1 Gbps, while next-generation Wi-Fi 6 routers could theoretically reach 10 Gbps, but it's only the beginning. The best list of wireless routers is a good place to start looking for faster routers.

  1. Replace The Antenna

If your router uses an internal antenna, it is recommended to add an external antenna, as external antennas tend to send stronger signals. In some cases, you can add an antenna to your router, but if you don't (or throw the antenna away a long time ago), many router manufacturers sell antennas separately.

  1. Wireless Range Extender Configuration

Distance is one of the most obvious problems. There are certain optimal ranges over which wireless signals can move. If your network needs to cover a larger area than your router can send, or if it has too many corners and walls to penetrate, performance will suffer.

If all of the above fails, your home may be too big for a router to send a good signal everywhere. All routers can only reliably transmit a certain distance before the signal weakens. If you want to further extend the signal, you will need some kind of range extender.